click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20130416
20130424
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5
this is a phony crisis, aimed at a $1.2 trillion tax hike because federal agencies cannot get their priorities in order. we've got proof. we're going to show you something. stay with us. kudlow. i know what you're thinking... transit fares! as in the 37 billion transit fares we help collect each year. no? oh, right. you're thinking of the 1.6 million daily customer care interactions xerox handles. or the 900 million health insurance claims we process. so, it's no surprise to you that companies depend on today's xerox for services that simplify how work gets done. which is...pretty much what we've always stood for. with xerox, you're ready real business. >>> all right. first up, as airport delays mount to the faa is blaming the spending cuts sequester, forcing thousands of air traffic controllers to take unpaid leave. but republicans blame the obama administration for selectively choosing which cuts would make us all feel the most pain. take a listen to kansas senator jerry moran earlier today. >> it seems as if politics is playing a significant role in the determining what actions the faa are
have a worry about the consumer and tax refunds will start coming now. credit conditions support employment and certainly consumer staples look very expensive. >> what about utilities up 19% so far this year? utilities are up 16% and health care up 19%. is your money safe in there? will they continue to hold up? >> we've been overweight utilities so i'm not going to be too uncomfortable with that and that's improvement with natural gas prices and in health care it's been very much about dividends and that we saw reimbursement rates that were supposed to be cut recallier this year, and i think it's too late to be on the healthcare bandwagon. >> sectors like materials which have not been with the rally and do you think some of the underperforming sectors will catch up? >> we are worried about materials still and we have to be careful in the u.s., chemicals are 20% metals and mining and look at the s&p 500 materials sector. europe is a big problem for chemical companies and even though they have shale gas as a feed stock, the problem is 20%, 25% of their business is probably going t
. >> yeah, it has, which is good because that may counteract the effects of the payroll tax high. what about gold? let's check the commodities like gold, the ten-year. down about 7%. 7 bucks to $1414. there's been a bit of a move in sort of the euro. we want to keep an eye on that. there's your currency chart here in the ten-year treasury note. we talk about home sales. you always want to watch the ten-year treasury note. the yield right now is at 1 o.66. in corporate news this morning, japan says final permission to resume flights on boeing's dreamliner, it may come as early as thursday. that's earlier than expected. yesterday, boeing's engineers began install b reinforced lithium ion batteries on all nippon airways jets. some investment banks that have been looking to sell businesses with liquid assets in order to appease regulators and bolster balance sheets. credit suisse cited the rule last summer as a reason for exploring that sale. also, a u.s. trade panel has ruled apple didn't violate a google patent to make the iphone. if it had been found guilty, the tech giant's popular devices c
. you've heard that the first quarter was tough. probably payroll tax impacted more than anything else. and small business is -- and big business for that matter is totally the flux with the obama care act and what it all means. and business is looking at part-time, that you've got to keep people under 30 hours. they don't want to employ more than 50 people. and nobody really knows how this thing is going to work. now, as far as the japanese yen, every major manufacturer in the world has made a strategic decision to produce where they sell. no manufacturer can deal with the volatility in exchange rates. and if you look at where the japanese are today compared to 10, 20 years ago, there is no comparison with let's say 80% produced in north america. so the exchange rate has been dramatically reduced as a factor in our business. and at the moment, i don't see any impact. >> okay, mike, $42. we've been friends a long time. you couldn't tell me at four bucks that that was something i should -- actually, we're not allowed to do it, anyway, but you couldn't have mentioned that back in 2008 or
be another one of those. but you have had the payroll tax increase go into effect. you've had sequestration go into effect. you have no growth in people's incomes. that was the more disappointing numbers out of the last unemployment insurance report. and if people don't have money, they can't spend money. and finally, we're being affected in the slowdown in europe in particular and the slowdown in the emerging markets. our export growth has fallen to about zero at the moment because there isn't demand overseas for our products. so it feels like a little bit of a soft spot, but we'll see. >> how much of this is consumer confidence, do you think? >> consumer confidence definitely plays a role. but consumers right now don't have the money to spend. and if they went out and spent, they'd be borrowing money. i don't think -- i think it's a more fundamental problem in a way than consumer confidence. >> steve, my long wait yesterday trying to get up to new york, in the lounge was tim geithner waiting for the flight, as well. i asked him, we're seeing these good signs in the economy, how much of it
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5